Articles - Post-Processing

Total articles: 20

Overcoming the Challenge of Depth of Field in Macro Photography

As anyone who has experimented with macro photography will know, this style of photography, and more specifically the nature of the subjects and lenses used, makes achieving a suitable depth of field very challenging. Some photographers may like to produce the style of image where only one small part of the image is in sharp... [more]

Time for a Sea Change?

It is no secret to those who know me well, in a photographic sense, that my motivation for photography in general, and seascapes in particular, has been distinctly lacking for the past year or so. Additionally, time has been lacking for a few years, and my ability to get out regularly for a shoot, even... [more]

Re-visiting a Six-Year-Old Brisbane Cityscape

On a wet and cold Sunday, I decided to re-visit a six-year old image and process it quite differently. Firstly, here is the result: In this version, the distortion has been corrected, and the contrast is much less aggressive. As a point of comparison, here is the original version: Naturally the perspective correction resulted in... [more]

HDR Processing: A New and Effective Technique

It has been a while since I posted an article on post-processing, and having discovered a new, effective and pleasing technique just last month, now is a good time to discuss my learning and show my results. Hopefully readers will find value in what I am about to present, both in words and images. HDR... [more]

Macro Experimentation: Focus Stacking

It has been a while since I shot a macro image. Photo macography is a form of photography which has traditionally frustated me, because it is very challenging in terms of depth of field. My past efforts have produced images where focus is very selective, and with a 180mm macro lens at minimum focus distance... [more]

Calvin Hollywood's "Freaky Detail"

A German photographer by the very cool name of Calvin Hollywood some time ago devised a Photoshop post-processing technique called "Freaky Detail". Hollywood's technique intensifies local contrast and brings out details.  It is very handy when applied to subject matter such as rock shelves, timber jetties, or any other weathered, texture-laden surface whose details you... [more]